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V² Dentistry - Dental Care | Keizer, OR

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We are filled with fun facts. We will entertain you with a new fun fact every week. Come back to see us, and share a fun fact of your own.

By v2dentistry26513402, Sep 7 2017 10:34PM

Regular dental visits are important year-round, but a back-to-school checkup is key in fighting the most common chronic disease found in school-age children: cavities. In fact, dental disease causes children to miss more than 51 million school hours each year.

Prevention and early detection can help avoid pain, trouble eating, difficulty speaking and school absences. When people are beginning to do their pediatrician checks to make sure their kids are school-ready, make sure teeth are part of it.

Plan Ahead

Between cookouts, camping trips and everything else on your family’s summer bucket list, it’s easy for school to sneak up on you. Unfortunately, many parents may not think about making that appointment until August.

Encourage Age-Appropriate Dental Habits at Home

The best kind of checkup is a cavity-free checkup. Moms and dads can help make this happen by encouraging kids to brush twice a day for two minutes and floss once a day. Here’s age-by-age advice:

Ages 6 and Under

At this age, your child might want to do all the brushing herself but doesn’t have the fine motor skills needed to do a thorough job. Let them start and jump in when needed. “During that age, the mouth is changing so much that children who are 5 or 6 are often brushing their teeth in the way they were when they were 2 or 3.

Ages 7-12

By now, your child knows what to do, she just might not want to. Keep encouraging healthy brushing and flossing habits. “Be aware of the fact that sometimes you have to take over a little bit more.

Ages 12-18

When you look at research for when caries appear in kids, it tends to be in young kids. But another bump-up time is teenage years and early adulthood. Part of this has to do with the fact that teenagers may have gone for many years and never had a cavity. They don’t necessarily take care of their teeth because they don’t see the consequence of not.

Don’t let your teen’s habits become out of sight, out of mind. “The behaviors of the teenager are going to translate into the 20-year-old. We want to be able to support them and be respectful of them because they’re not kids anymore.

By v2dentistry26513402, Jul 18 2017 09:31PM

1. Not only does it quench your thirst, it can also quench inflammation that contributes to conditions like asthma, atherosclerosis, diabetes, colon cancer, and arthritis.

2. Over 1,200 varieties of watermelon are grown worldwide.

3. Watermelon is an ideal health food because it doesn’t contain any fat or cholesterol, is high in fiber and vitamins A & C and is a good source of potassium.

4. Pink watermelon is also a source of the potent carotenoid antioxidant, lycopene. These powerful antioxidants travel through the body neutralizing free radicals.

5. Watermelon is a vegetable! It is related to cucumbers, pumpkins and squash.

6. Early explorers used watermelons as canteens.

7. Watermelon is grown in over 96 countries worldwide.

8. In China and Japan watermelon is a popular gift to bring a host.

9. In Israel and Egypt, the sweet taste of watermelon is often paired with the salty taste of feta cheese.

10. Every part of a watermelon is edible, even the seeds and rinds.

By v2dentistry26513402, Jun 15 2017 10:27PM

Brushing and flossing are everyday ways to keep your teeth bright, white and healthy. Still, if you might feel like your smile is lacking some sparkle or is more yellow than it used to be, you’re not alone. When the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry asked people what they’d most like to improve about their smile, the most common response was whiter teeth. The American Association of Orthodontists also found that nearly 90% of patients requested tooth whitening.

Thinking about teeth whitening? Get the facts first. Here are five of the most commonly asked questions about the process.

1. Why Did My Teeth Change Color?

Over time, your teeth can go from white to not-so-bright for a number of reasons:

Food and Drink

Coffee, tea and red wine are some major staining culprits. What do they have in common? Intense color pigments called chromogens that attach to the white, outer part of your tooth (enamel).

Tobacco Use

Two chemicals found in tobacco create stubborn stains: Tar and nicotine. Tar is naturally dark. Nicotine is colorless until it’s mixed with oxygen. Then, it turns into a yellowish, surface-staining substance.

Age

Below the hard, white outer shell of your teeth (enamel) is a softer area called dentin. Over time, the outer enamel layer gets thinner with brushing and more of the yellowish dentin shows through.

Trauma

If you’ve been hit in the mouth, your tooth may change color because it reacts to an injury by laying down more dentin, which is a darker layer under the enamel.

Medications

Tooth darkening can be a side effect of certain antihistamines, antipsychotics and high blood pressure medications. Young children who are exposed to antibiotics like tetracycline and doxycycline when their teeth are forming (either in the womb or as a baby) may have discoloration of their adult teeth later in life. Chemotherapy and head and neck radiation can also darken teeth.

2. How Does Teeth Whitening Work?

Teeth whitening is a simple process. Whitening products contain one of two tooth bleaches (hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide). These bleaches break stains into smaller pieces, which makes the color less concentrated and your teeth brighter.

3. Does Whitening Work on All Teeth?

No, which is why it’s important to talk to your dentist before deciding to whiten your teeth, as whiteners may not correct all types of discoloration. For example, yellow teeth will probably bleach well, brown teeth may not respond as well and teeth with gray tones may not bleach at all. Whitening will not work on caps, veneers, crowns or fillings. It also won’t be effective if your tooth discoloration is caused by medications or a tooth injury.

4. What Are My Whitening Options?

Talk to your dentist before starting. If you are a candidate, there are three ways to put the shine back in your smile:

• Whitening Toothpastes

All toothpastes help remove surface stain through the action of mild abrasives that scrub the teeth. Look for the ADA Seal for safe whitening toothpastes that have special chemical or polishing agents to provide additional stain removal effectiveness. Unlike bleaches, these types of ADA Accepted products do not change the color of teeth because they can only remove stains on the surface.

• In-Office Bleaching

This procedure is called chairside bleaching and usually requires only one office visit. The dentist will apply either a protective gel to your gums or a rubber shield to protect your gums. Bleach is then applied to the teeth.

• At-Home Bleaching

Peroxide-containing whiteners actually bleach the tooth enamel. They typically come in a gel and are placed in a tray that fits on your teeth. You may also use a whitening strip that sticks to your teeth. The concentration of the bleaching agent is lower than what your dentist would use in the office.

5. Are There Any Side Effects from Teeth Whitening?

Some people who use teeth whiteners may experience tooth sensitivity. That happens when the peroxide in the whitener gets through the enamel to the soft layer of dentin and irritates the nerve of your tooth. In most cases the sensitivity is temporary. You can delay treatment, then try again.

Overuse of whiteners can also damage the tooth enamel or gums, so be sure to follow directions and talk to your dentist.

By v2dentistry26513402, Jun 6 2017 05:31PM

Sunday is Father's Day, the annual holiday where Americans celebrate the men who made them. You may love dear old dad, but how much do you actually know about the observance in his honor? Brush up on your Father's Day background before the big Sunday barbecue.

Father's Day officially began in 1910 in Spokane, Washington, where 27-year-old Sonora Dodd proposed it as a way to honor the man who raised her when her mom died in childbirth. Dodd was at a church service thinking about how grateful she was for her father when she had the idea for Father's Day, which would mirror Mother's Day but be celebrated in June -- her dad's birthday month.

The movement grew for years but didn't gain national-event status until 1924 under former President Calvin Coolidge. He said it would "establish more intimate relations between fathers and their children" and "impress upon fathers the full measure of their obligations," according to the Library of Congress Wise Guide.

The holiday gained traction during World War II, and in 1966 President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed the third Sunday of June to be Father's Day. President Richard Nixon made it a federal holiday six years later.

Today, Father's Day has a passionate following, with about three-quarters of Americans telling the National Retail Federation they plan to celebrate on Sunday. Here are more facts about the holiday:

1. Census data shows there are more than 70.1 million dads in the U.S. About a third of them are married with kids under 18.

2. Two million fathers are single.

3. Spending on Father's Day will reach about $12.7 billion this year, with the average person spending about $115.57 on presents. That's about $2 more than last year's average.

4. Father's Day is the fourth-biggest day for sending greeting cards, after Christmas, Valentine's Day and Mother's Day, according to the Greeting Card Association.

5. About 20 percent of Father's Day cards are bought for husbands.

6. More than 214,000 men are stay-at-home dads.

7. Thailand's Father's Day is celebrated in December, on the birthday of King Bhumibol Adulyadej. Everyone wears yellow.

8. On Father's Day in Germany, men drink all day at beer gardens.

By v2dentistry26513402, May 11 2017 04:58PM

Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms out there! Our special day this year is May 14, which is traditionally celebrated on the second Sunday of every year. Some fascinating facts about Mother’s Day from will make you want to pick up the phone and call that special lady in your life!

-Anna Jarvis is credited with the spark that inspired President Woodrow Wilson to declare Mother’s Day an official holiday in 1914. She had no children, and tirelessly campaigned for a special day for moms.

-In the USA, over $14 billion dollars is spent on Mother’s Day each year.

-At least 122 million phone calls to mom are made on Mother’s Day each year.

-Top gifts for mom include candy, flowers, jewelry, gift cards, and going out to eat.

-The oldest person to ever give birth was Satyabhama Mahapatra, a 65-year-old retired schoolteacher in India, on April 9, 2003. (it was a boy)

-Pink and Red carnations are given to mothers who are still alive, and white ones are for those who have passed away.

-In Yugoslavia, children tie their mothers up on Mother’s Day, and the only way she can free herself is to give the kids treats.

-One fourth of all flowers purchased throughout the year are bought specifically for Mother’s Day

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